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Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014 Oct 28;22:59. doi: 10.1186/s13049-014-0059-x.

Comparison of CPR quality and rescuer fatigue between standard 30:2 CPR and chest compression-only CPR: a randomized crossover manikin trial.

Author information

1
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. skyshiner@naver.com.
2
Department of Emergency Medicine, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Changwon, South Korea. 3syellow@naver.com.
3
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. emdrlee@gmail.com.
4
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. borambls@gmail.com.
5
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. brmeremt130@naver.com.
6
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. nlorlove@naver.com.
7
Department of Emergency Medicine, Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. sos2623@hanmail.net.
8
Department of Emergency Medicine, Gachon University Gill Hospital, Incheon, South Korea. empearl@gilhospital.com.
9
Depatment of Emergency Medical Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon, South Korea. lije@dongnam.ac.kr.
10
Depatment of Emergency Medical Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon, South Korea. drlee@dongnam.ac.kr.
11
Depatment of Emergency Medical Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon, South Korea. emtko@dongnam.ac.kr.
12
Depatment of Emergency Medical Technology, Dongnam Health University, Suwon, South Korea. emthong@dongnam.ac.kr.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to compare rescuer fatigue and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) quality between standard 30:2 CPR (ST-CPR) and chest compression only CPR (CO-CPR) performed for 8 minutes on a realistic manikin by following the 2010 CPR guidelines.

METHODS:

All 36 volunteers (laypersons; 18 men and 18 women) were randomized to ST-CPR or CO-CPR at first, and then each CPR technique was performed for 8 minutes with a 3-hour rest interval. We measured the mean blood pressure (MBP) of the volunteers before and after performing each CPR technique, and continuously monitored the heart rate (HR) of the volunteers during each CPR technique using the MRx monitor. CPR quality measures included the depth of chest compression (CC) and the number of adequate CCs per minute.

RESULTS:

The adequate CC rate significantly differed between the 2 groups after 2 minutes, with it being higher in the ST-CPR group than in the CO-CPR group. Additionally, the adequate CC rate significantly differed between the 2 groups during 8 minutes for male volunteers (p =0.012). The number of adequate CCs was higher in the ST-CPR group than in the CO-CPR group after 3 minutes (p =0.001). The change in MBP before and after performing CPR did not differ between the 2 groups. However, the change in HR during 8 minutes of CPR was higher in the CO-CPR group than in the ST-CPR group (p =0.007).

CONCLUSIONS:

The rate and number of adequate CCs were significantly lower with the CO-CPR than with the ST-CPR after 2 and 6 minutes, respectively, and performer fatigue was higher with the CO-CPR than with the ST-CPR during 8 minutes of CPR.

PMID:
25348723
PMCID:
PMC4219085
DOI:
10.1186/s13049-014-0059-x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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