Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Child Neurol. 2015 Jul;30(8):1024-8. doi: 10.1177/0883073814552191. Epub 2014 Oct 27.

Factors Associated With Increased In-Hospital Mortality Among Children With Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine and Neurology, Ochsner Neuroscience Institute, Ochsner Clinic Foundation, New Orleans, LA, USA Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute, St Cloud, MN, USA malikmuhammad.adil@gmail.com.
2
Zeenat Qureshi Stroke Institute, St Cloud, MN, USA.
3
Departments of Pediatrics and Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA.

Abstract

We assessed factors associated with mortality and potential targets for intervention in a large national sample of children with nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage. Using Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database ICD-9-CM code 431 identified children aged 1 to 18 years with nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage in 2003, 2006 and 2009. Intracerebral hemorrhage was the primary diagnosis for 1172 children (ages 1-18 years) over the 3-year sample. Factors associated with mortality based on multivariable logistic regression included Hispanic ethnicity (odds ratio 1.9, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.3), older age (11-18 vs 1-10 years, odds ratio 2.5, 95% confidence interval 1.3-5.0), coagulopathy (odds ratio 3.0, 95% confidence interval 1.6-6.0), and coma (odds ratio 9.0, 95% confidence interval 3.2-24.6). From 2003 to 2009, there was a non-significant decrease in mortality with a significant increase in length of stay from 9 to 11 days (P < .003). In children with intracerebral hemorrhage, coma and coagulopathy had the strongest association with mortality; coagulopathy is a potentially modifiable risk factor.

KEYWORDS:

child; intracerebral hemorrhage; mortality

PMID:
25348418
PMCID:
PMC4411178
DOI:
10.1177/0883073814552191
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center