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PLoS One. 2014 Oct 27;9(10):e108407. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0108407. eCollection 2014.

MSH1-induced non-genetic variation provides a source of phenotypic diversity in Sorghum bicolor.

Author information

1
Center for Plant Science Innovation, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States of America; Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States of America.
2
Monsanto, Chesterfield Village Research Center, Chesterfield, Missouri, United States of America.
3
Center for Plant Science Innovation, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States of America.
4
Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, University of Nebraska Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States of America.

Abstract

MutS Homolog 1 (MSH1) encodes a plant-specific protein that functions in mitochondria and chloroplasts. We showed previously that disruption or suppression of the MSH1 gene results in a process of developmental reprogramming that is heritable and non-genetic in subsequent generations. In Arabidopsis, this developmental reprogramming process is accompanied by striking changes in gene expression of organellar and stress response genes. This developmentally reprogrammed state, when used in crossing, results in a range of variation for plant growth potential. Here we investigate the implications of MSH1 modulation in a crop species. We found that MSH1-mediated phenotypic variation in Sorghum bicolor is heritable and potentially valuable for crop breeding. We observed phenotypic variation for grain yield, plant height, flowering time, panicle architecture, and above-ground biomass. Focusing on grain yield and plant height, we found some lines that appeared to respond to selection. Based on amenability of this system to implementation in a range of crops, and the scope of phenotypic variation that is derived, our results suggest that MSH1 suppression provides a novel approach for breeding in crops.

PMID:
25347794
PMCID:
PMC4209972
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0108407
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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