Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Transgenic Res. 2015 Feb;24(1):1-17. doi: 10.1007/s11248-014-9843-7. Epub 2014 Oct 26.

A comparative analysis of insertional effects in genetically engineered plants: considerations for pre-market assessments.

Author information

  • 1Plant and Biotechnology Risk Assessment Unit, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, 1400 Merivale Road, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0Y9, Canada, jaimie.schnell@inspection.gc.ca.

Abstract

During genetic engineering, DNA is inserted into a plant's genome, and such insertions are often accompanied by the insertion of additional DNA, deletions and/or rearrangements. These genetic changes are collectively known as insertional effects, and they have the potential to give rise to unintended traits in plants. In addition, there are many other genetic changes that occur in plants both spontaneously and as a result of conventional breeding practices. Genetic changes similar to insertional effects occur in plants, namely as a result of the movement of transposable elements, the repair of double-strand breaks by non-homologous end-joining, and the intracellular transfer of organelle DNA. Based on this similarity, insertional effects should present a similar level of risk as these other genetic changes in plants, and it is within the context of these genetic changes that insertional effects must be considered. Increased familiarity with genetic engineering techniques and advances in molecular analysis techniques have provided us with a greater understanding of the nature and impact of genetic changes in plants, and this can be used to refine pre-market assessments of genetically engineered plants and food and feeds derived from genetically engineered plants.

PMID:
25344849
PMCID:
PMC4274372
DOI:
10.1007/s11248-014-9843-7
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Springer Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center