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Nat Cell Biol. 2014 Nov;16(11):1035-44. doi: 10.1038/ncb3052. Epub 2014 Oct 26.

Pri peptides are mediators of ecdysone for the temporal control of development.

Author information

1
1] Centre de Biologie du Développement, Université de Toulouse, UPS, 31062 Toulouse cedex 9, France [2] CNRS, UMR5547, Centre de Biologie du Développement, Toulouse, 31062 cedex 9, France.
2
Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience, National institutes of Natural Sciences Okazaki, Aichi 444-8787, Japan.
3
Institute for Genomics and Systems Biology and Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.
4
Research Center for Environmental Genomics, Organization of Advanced Science and Technology, Kobe University, Kobe 657-850, Japan.
5
Animal Genetics, Interfaculty Institute for Cell Biology, University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
6
1] Research Center for Environmental Genomics, Organization of Advanced Science and Technology, Kobe University, Kobe 657-850, Japan [2] Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, Kobe 657-850, Japan.

Abstract

Animal development fundamentally relies on the precise control, in space and time, of genome expression. Whereas we have a wealth of information about spatial patterning, the mechanisms underlying temporal control remain poorly understood. Here we show that Pri peptides, encoded by small open reading frames, are direct mediators of the steroid hormone ecdysone for the timing of developmental programs in Drosophila. We identify a previously uncharacterized enzyme of ecdysone biosynthesis, GstE14, and find that ecdysone triggers pri expression to define the onset of epidermal trichome development, through post-translational control of the Shavenbaby transcription factor. We show that manipulating pri expression is sufficient to either put on hold or induce premature differentiation of trichomes. Furthermore, we find that ecdysone-dependent regulation of pri is not restricted to epidermis and occurs over various tissues and times. Together, these findings provide a molecular framework to explain how systemic hormonal control coordinates specific programs of differentiation with developmental timing.

PMID:
25344753
DOI:
10.1038/ncb3052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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