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Nat Neurosci. 2014 Dec;17(12):1728-35. doi: 10.1038/nn.3852. Epub 2014 Oct 26.

Rods in daylight act as relay cells for cone-driven horizontal cell-mediated surround inhibition.

Author information

1
Neural Circuit Laboratories, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland.
2
1] Neural Circuit Laboratories, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. [2] Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
3
1] Neural Circuit Laboratories, Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. [2] University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland.
4
Department of Pharmacy-Center for Drug Research, Center for Integrated Protein Science Munich, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich, Germany.
5
Department of Biology, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
6
Department of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA.
7
1] Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Sorbonne Universités, Institut de la Vision, Paris, France. [2] Institut national de la santé et de la recherche médicale, Institut de la Vision, Paris, France. [3] Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Institut de la Vision, Paris, France. [4] Centre Hospitalier National d'Ophtalmologie des Quinze-Vingts, Département Hospitalo-Universitaire ViewMaintain, Paris, France. [5] Fondation Ophtalmologique Adolphe de Rothschild, Paris, France.
8
1] Department of Physics, École Normale Supérieure, Paris, France. [2] Laboratoire de Physique Statistique, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Université Denis Diderot, Paris, France.

Abstract

Vertebrate vision relies on two types of photoreceptors, rods and cones, which signal increments in light intensity with graded hyperpolarizations. Rods operate in the lower range of light intensities while cones operate at brighter intensities. The receptive fields of both photoreceptors exhibit antagonistic center-surround organization. Here we show that at bright light levels, mouse rods act as relay cells for cone-driven horizontal cell-mediated surround inhibition. In response to large, bright stimuli that activate their surrounds, rods depolarize. Rod depolarization increases with stimulus size, and its action spectrum matches that of cones. Rod responses at high light levels are abolished in mice with nonfunctional cones and when horizontal cells are reversibly inactivated. Rod depolarization is conveyed to the inner retina via postsynaptic circuit elements, namely the rod bipolar cells. Our results show that the retinal circuitry repurposes rods, when they are not directly sensing light, to relay cone-driven surround inhibition.

Comment in

PMID:
25344628
DOI:
10.1038/nn.3852
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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