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PLoS One. 2014 Oct 24;9(10):e110526. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110526. eCollection 2014.

Serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains carried by children infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

Author information

1
Eijkman Institute for Molecular Biology, Jakarta, Indonesia.
2
Department of Child Health, Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital/Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia.
3
Eijkman Oxford Clinical Research Unit, Jakarta, Indonesia.
4
Faculty of Biology, Gajah Mada University, Yogyakarta, Indonesia.
5
Department of Pediatric Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Wilhelmina?s Children Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

We studied the serotype distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates carried by children infected with HIV in Jakarta, Indonesia.

METHODS:

Nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from 90 HIV infected children aged 4 to 144 months. S. pneumoniae was identified by conventional and molecular methods. Serotyping was performed with sequential multiplex PCR and antibiotic susceptibility with the disk diffusion method.

RESULTS:

We identified S. pneumoniae carriage in 41 children (46%). Serotype 19 F was most common among 42 cultured strains (19%) followed by 19 A and 6A/B (10% each), and 23 F (7%). Most isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol (86%), followed by clindamycin (79%), erythromycin (76%), tetracycline (43%), and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (41%). Resistance to penicillin was most common with only 33% of strains being susceptible. Strains of serotypes targeted by the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate polysaccharide vaccine (PCV13) were more likely to be multidrug resistant (13 of 25 or 52%) compared to non-PCV13 serotype isolates (3 of 17 or 18%; Fisher exact test p = 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Our study provides insight into the epidemiology of pneumococcal carriage in young HIV patients in Indonesia. These findings may facilitate potential preventive strategies that target invasive pneumococcal disease in Indonesia.

PMID:
25343448
PMCID:
PMC4208773
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0110526
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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