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Chest. 2015 Mar;147(3):662-672. doi: 10.1378/chest.14-1488.

Family-based psychosocial support and education as part of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
School of Health Sciences (ESSUA), Unidade de Investigação e Formação sobre Adultos e Idosos (UNIFAI), Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: amarques@ua.pt.
2
School of Health Sciences (ESSUA), University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
3
School of Health Sciences (ESSUA), Department of Health Sciences (SACS), University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal.
4
Graduate Department of Rehabilitation Science, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
5
School of Health Sciences (ESSUA), Unidade de Investigação e Formação sobre Adultos e Idosos (UNIFAI), Porto, Portugal.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Involving family as part of the patient's rehabilitation plan of care might enhance the management of COPD. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a family-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program on patients and family members' coping strategies to manage COPD.

METHODS:

Family dyads (patient and family member) were randomly assigned to family-based (experimental) or conventional (control) PR. Patients from both groups underwent exercise training three times a week and psychosocial support and education once a week, during 12 weeks. Family members of the family-based PR attended the psychosocial support and education sessions together with patients. In the conventional PR, family members did not participate. Family coping and psychosocial adjustment to illness were assessed in patients and family members of both groups. Patients' exercise tolerance, functional balance, muscle strength, and health-related quality of life were also measured. All measures were collected pre/post-program.

RESULTS:

Forty-two dyads participated (patients: FEV1, 70.4% ± 22.1% predicted). Patients (P = .048) and family members (P = .004) in the family-based PR had significantly greater improvements in family coping than the control group. Family members of the family-based PR had significantly greater changes in sexual relationships (P = .026) and in psychologic distress (P = .033) compared with the control group. Patients from both groups experienced significant improvements in exercise tolerance, functional balance, knee extensors strength, and health-related quality of life after intervention (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

This research supports family-based PR programs to enhance coping and psychosocial adjustment to illness of the family system.

TRIAL REGISTRY:

ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT02048306; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

PMID:
25340477
DOI:
10.1378/chest.14-1488
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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