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Zhongguo Zhen Jiu. 2014 Aug;34(8):747-50.

[Clinical research of post-stroke insomnia treated with low-frequency electric stimulation at acupoints in the patients].

[Article in Chinese]

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the difference in the clinical efficacy on post-stroke insomnia between the low-frequency electric stimulation at the acupoints and the conventional western medication.

METHODS:

One hundred and twenty patients of post-stroke insomnia were randomized into a low-frequency electric stimulation group, a medication group and a placebo group, 40 cases in each one. In the low-frequency electric stimulation group, the low-frequency electric-pulsing apparatus was used at Dazhui (GV 14) and Shenshu (BL 23), once a day; the treatment of 15 days made one session and 2 sessions were required. In the medication group, estazolam was taken orally, 1 mg each time. In the placebo group, starch capsules were taken orally, 1 capsule each time. All the drugs were taken before sleep every night, continuously for 15 days as one session, and 2 sessions were required. PSQI changes and clinical efficacy were observed before and after treatment in each group.

RESULTS:

Pitlsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) score was reduced in every group after treatment (all P < 0.01). In the low-frequency electric stimulation group and medication group, the score was reduced much more significantly as compared with the placebo group (both P < 0.01). In the placebo group, 1 case was rejected. The total effective rates were 95.0% (38/40), 92.5% (37/40) and 17.9% (7/39) in the low-frequency electric stimulation group, medication group and placebo group separately. The efficacy in the low-frequency electric stimulation group and medication group was better apparently than that in the placebo group (both P < 0.01).

CONCLUSION:

The low-frequency electric stimulation at the acupoints effectively and safely treats post-stroke insomnia and the efficacy of it is similar to that of estazolam.

PMID:
25335247
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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