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Arch Clin Neuropsychol. 2014 Dec;29(8):793-805. doi: 10.1093/arclin/acu050. Epub 2014 Oct 19.

A scale of socioemotional dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia.

Author information

1
V.A. Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA joseph.barsuglia@va.gov joseph.barsuglia@gmail.com.
2
V.A. Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
V.A. Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
4
V.A. Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
V.A. Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA Department of Psychiatry & Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

Early social dysfunction is a hallmark symptom of behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD); however, validated measures for assessing social deficits in dementia are needed. The purpose of the current study was to examine the utility of a novel informant-based measure of social impairment, the Socioemotional Dysfunction Scale (SDS) in early-onset dementia. Sixteen bvFTD and 18 early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) participants received standard clinical neuropsychological measures and neuroimaging. Caregiver informants were administered the SDS. Individuals with bvFTD exhibited greater social dysfunction on the SDS compared with the EOAD group; t(32) = 6.32, p < .001. The scale demonstrated preliminary evidence for discriminating these frequently misdiagnosed groups (area under the curve = 0.920, p = <.001) and internal consistency α = 0.977. The SDS demonstrated initial evidence as an effective measure for detecting abnormal social behavior and discriminating bvFTD from EOAD. Future validation is recommended in larger and more diverse patient groups.

KEYWORDS:

Behavioral assessment; Dementia; Neurodegenerative diseases; Presenile dementia; Semantic dementia; Social behavior

PMID:
25331776
PMCID:
PMC4296158
DOI:
10.1093/arclin/acu050
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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