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J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn. 2015 Jan;41(1):77-94. doi: 10.1037/a0037778. Epub 2014 Oct 20.

Friends and foes in the lexicon: homophone naming in aphasia.

Author information

1
Research Department, Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute.
2
Educational Psychology Program and Center for Advanced Study in Education, City University of New York.

Abstract

The study of homophones--words with different meanings that sound the same--has great potential to inform models of language production. Of particular relevance is a phenomenon termed frequency inheritance, where a low-frequency word (e.g., deer) is produced more fluently than would be expected based on its frequency characteristics, presumably because of shared phonology with a high-frequency homophone counterpart (e.g., dear). However, prior studies have been inconsistent in showing frequency inheritance. To explain this inconsistency, we propose a dual nature account of homophony: a high-frequency counterpart exerts 2 counterposing effects on a low-frequency homophone target during the 2 main stages of naming: (a) a detrimental impact during semantically driven lexical retrieval; (b) a beneficial impact during phonological retrieval. In a study of naming in participants with chronic aphasia followed by computational investigations, we find strong evidence for the dual nature account of homophony.

PMID:
25329091
PMCID:
PMC4293245
DOI:
10.1037/a0037778
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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