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BMC Public Health. 2014 Oct 18;14:1082. doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-14-1082.

Mobile health, exercise and metabolic risk: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Western University, Department of Family Medicine, Centre for Studies in Family Medicine, Western Centre for Public Health and Family Medicine, (2nd Floor), 1151 Richmond St,, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada. petrella@uwo.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

It was hypothesized that a mobile health (mHealth) intervention would elicit greater improvements in systolic blood pressure and other cardiometabolic risk factors at 12 weeks, which would be better maintained over 52 weeks, compared to the active control intervention.

METHODS:

Eligible participants (≥2 metabolic syndrome risk factors) were randomized to the mHealth intervention (n = 75) or the active control group (n = 74). Blood pressure and other cardiometabolic risk factors were measured at baseline and at 12, 24 and 52 weeks. Both groups received an individualized exercise prescription and the intervention group additionally received a technology kit for home monitoring of biometrics and physical activity.

RESULTS:

Analyses were conducted on 67 participants in the intervention group (aged 56.7 ± 9.7 years; 71.6% female) and 60 participants in the active control group (aged 59.1 ± 8.4 years; 76.7% female). At 12 weeks, baseline adjusted mean change in systolic blood pressure (primary outcome) was greater in the active control group compared to the intervention group (-5.68 mmHg; 95% CI -10.86 to -0.50 mmHg; p = 0.03), but there were no differences between groups in mean change for secondary outcomes. Over 52-weeks, the difference in mean change for systolic blood pressure was no longer apparent between groups, but remained significant across the entire population (time: p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

In participants with increased cardiometabolic risk, exercise prescription alone had greater short-term improvements in systolic blood pressure compared to the mHealth intervention, though over 52 weeks, improvements were equal between interventions.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov http://NCT01944124.

PMID:
25326074
PMCID:
PMC4210561
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2458-14-1082
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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