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Nat Rev Immunol. 2014 Nov;14(11):744-57. doi: 10.1038/nri3742. Epub 2014 Oct 17.

Innate sensing of malaria parasites.

Author information

1
1] Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 01605-02324 Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Laboratório de Imunopatologia, Centro de Pesquisa René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, 30190-002 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. [3] Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
2
Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 01605-02324 Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.
3
1] Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 01605-02324 Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Laboratório de Imunopatologia, Centro de Pesquisa René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, 30190-002 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

Abstract

Innate immune receptors have a key role in immune surveillance by sensing microorganisms and initiating protective immune responses. However, the innate immune system is a classic 'double-edged sword' that can overreact to pathogens, which can have deleterious effects and lead to clinical manifestations. Recent studies have unveiled the complexity of innate immune receptors that function as sensors of Plasmodium spp. in the vertebrate host. This Review highlights the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Plasmodium infection is sensed by different families of innate immune receptors. We also discuss how these events mediate both host resistance to infection and the pathogenesis of malaria.

PMID:
25324127
DOI:
10.1038/nri3742
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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