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Nat Rev Cancer. 2014 Nov;14(11):722-35. doi: 10.1038/nrc3838. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Translational biology of osteosarcoma.

Author information

1
1] Research Division, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, 3002, Victoria, Australia. [2] Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Victoria, Australia.
2
1] Immunology in Cancer and Infection Laboratory and Cancer Immunoregulation and Immunotherapy Laboratory, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, 4006, Queensland, Australia. [2] School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Herston, 4006, Queensland, Australia.
3
1] Research Division, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, 3002, Victoria, Australia. [2] Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Victoria, Australia. [3] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, 2010, New South Wales, Australia.

Abstract

For the past 30 years, improvements in the survival of patients with osteosarcoma have been mostly incremental. Despite evidence of genomic instability and a high frequency of chromothripsis and kataegis, osteosarcomas carry few recurrent targetable mutations, and trials of targeted agents have been generally disappointing. Bone has a highly specialized immune environment and many immune signalling pathways are important in bone homeostasis. The success of the innate immune stimulant mifamurtide in the adjuvant treatment of non-metastatic osteosarcoma suggests that newer immune-based treatments, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, may substantially improve disease outcome.

PMID:
25319867
DOI:
10.1038/nrc3838
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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