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NeuroRehabilitation. 2014;35(4):789-94. doi: 10.3233/NRE-141162.

Effects of an adapted physical activity program on motor and non-motor functions and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Sciences "M. Aresu", University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy Adapted Physical Activity Master Degree Course, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
2
Movement Disorders Center, Institute of Neurology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy Adapted Physical Activity Master Degree Course, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
3
Adapted Physical Activity Master Degree Course, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
4
Department of Medical Sciences "M. Aresu", University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.
5
Movement Disorders Center, Institute of Neurology, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have clearly shown that strategies of health promotion, such as fitness and general exercise programs, may improve quality of life (QoL), motor and non-motor functions in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. However, little is known about the effects of specific Adapted Physical Activity (APA) programs on PD patients.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effects of an APA program on motor and non-motor symptoms, functional performances and QoL in PD patients.

METHODS:

Nine consecutive PD patients (5 men, 4 women, 64.4 ± 6.8 years) able to ambulate independently (Hoehn and Yahr: from stage 1 to 3) and not demented, were enrolled. Patients performed an APA program, 3 sessions/week, for 9 weeks. Exercises focused on balance, walking, strength and functional activities. Functional effects were assessed by Six Minute Walking Test (6MWT), Five Time Sit to Stand Test (FTSST), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Sit and Reach Test (SRT), and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Motor impairment and disability were assessed using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale - part III (UPDRS-III) and the Hoehn and Yahr Scale, respectively. Non-motor symptoms were evaluated by PD Fatigue Scale (PFS), Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and PD Quality of life scale, 8 items (PDQ-8).

RESULTS:

A significant decrease in resting HR (67.55 ± 10.85 vs 70.22 ± 12.34 bpm, p < 0.05) and a significant increase in walked distance (p < 0.0005) were observed. A significant impairment of the muscles strength was noted (FTSST, p < 0.05). BBS showed a significant increase in balance abilities (p < 0.0005) and safety with mobility (TUG, p < 0.005) was enhanced. Finally, a significant improvement in motor and non-motor symptoms was detected: UPDRS-III (p < 0.00005), PFS (p < 0.005), BDI-II (p < 0.05) and PDQ-8 (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

A tailored exercise program in PD patients could be effective as an adjunct to conventional therapy on improving daily activities, motor and non-motor symptoms, with better QoL.

KEYWORDS:

APA; Parkinson's disease; QoL

PMID:
25318771
DOI:
10.3233/NRE-141162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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