Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Behav Addict. 2014 Sep;3(3):133-48. doi: 10.1556/JBA.3.2014.016. Epub 2014 Aug 26.

The uses and abuses of Facebook: A review of Facebook addiction.

Author information

1
School of Health Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
2
School of Design and Social Context, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND AIMS:

Recent research suggests that use of social networking sites can be addictive for some individuals. Due to the link between motivations for media use and the development of addiction, this systematic review examines Facebook-related uses and gratifications research and Facebook addiction research.

METHOD:

Searches of three large academic databases revealed 24 studies examining the uses and gratifications of Facebook, and nine studies of Facebook addiction.

RESULTS:

Comparison of uses and gratifications research reveals that the most popular mo- tives for Facebook use are relationship maintenance, passing time, entertainment, and companionship. These motivations may be related to Facebook addiction through use that is habitual, excessive, or motivated by a desire for mood alteration. Examination of Facebook addiction research indicates that Facebook use can become habitual or excessive, and some addicts use the site to escape from negative moods. However, examination of Facebook addic- tion measures highlights inconsistency in the field.

DISCUSSION:

There is some evidence to support the argument that uses and gratifications of Facebook are linked with Facebook addiction. Furthermore, it appears as if the social skill model of addiction may explain Facebook addiction, but inconsistency in the measurement of this condition limits the ability to provide conclusive arguments.

CONCLUSIONS:

This paper recommends that further research be performed to establish the links between uses and gratifications and Facebook addiction. Furthermore, in order to enhance the construct validity of Facebook addiction, researchers should take a more systematic approach to assessment.

KEYWORDS:

Facebook; addiction; social networking sites; uses and gratifications

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center