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J Infect Dis. 2014 Nov 1;210 Suppl 1:S304-14. doi: 10.1093/infdis/jiu294.

Laboratory challenges in response to silent introduction and sustained transmission of wild poliovirus type 1 in Israel during 2013.

Author information

1
Central Virology Laboratory, Public Health Services, Israel Ministry of Health, Sheba Medical Center Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv.
2
Division of Epidemiology Public Health Services Braun School of Public Health and Community Medicine, Hebrew University Hadassah Faculty of Medicine, Jerusalem.
3
Israel Center for Disease Control, Tel Hashomer.
4
South District Health Office, Ministry of Health Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva.
5
Public Health Services.
6
Division of Epidemiology Public Health Services.
7
Central Virology Laboratory, Public Health Services, Israel Ministry of Health, Sheba Medical Center.
8
Public Health Services Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva.
9
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv Head National Committee for Monitoring Poliovirus Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel.
10
Edith Wolfson Medical Center, Holon, Israel.
11
Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv Office of the Director General, Ministry of Health.

Abstract

Wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) introduction into southern Israel in early 2013 was detected by routine environmental surveillance. The virus was identified genetically as related to the South Asian (SOAS) R3A lineage endemic to Pakistan in 2012. Intensified, high-throughput environmental surveillance using advanced molecular methods played a critical role in documenting and locating sustained transmission throughout 2013 and early 2014 in the absence of any acute flaccid paralysis. It guided the public health responses, including stool-based surveillance and serosurveys, to determine the point prevalence in silent excretors and measured the effect of vaccination campaigns with inactivated polio vaccine and bivalent oral polio vaccine on stopping transmission.

KEYWORDS:

emergency health policy response; environmental surveillance; epidemiology; molecular analysis; silent poliovirus transmission; vaccine; wild poliovirus

PMID:
25316849
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiu294
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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