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J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015;28(17):2020-7. doi: 10.3109/14767058.2014.977248. Epub 2014 Nov 7.

The favorable effects of garlic intake on metabolic profiles, hs-CRP, biomarkers of oxidative stress and pregnancy outcomes in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Author information

1
a Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics , School of Medicine, Shaheed Beheshti University of Medical Sciences , Tehran , Iran .
2
b Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics , School of Medicine, Arak University of Medical Sciences , Arak , Iran , and.
3
c Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences , Kashan , Iran.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was performed to determine the favorable effects of garlic on metabolic status and pregnancy outcomes among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia.

METHODS:

This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted among 44 pregnant women, primigravida, aged 18-40 years old at 27 weeks' gestation with positive roll-over test. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either one garlic tablet (equal to 400 mg garlic and 1 mg allicin) (n = 22) or placebo (n = 22) once daily for 9 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 9 weeks' intervention to measure metabolic profiles and biomarkers of oxidative stress.

RESULTS:

Administration of garlic compared with the placebo resulted in decreased levels of serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (-1425.90 versus 1360.50 ng/mL, p = 0.01) and increased plasma glutathione (GSH) (+98.10 versus. -49.87 µmol/l, p = 0.03). A trend toward a significant effect of garlic intake on reducing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) (p = 0.07), insulin (p = 0.09) and increasing quantitative insulin sensitivity check (QUICKI) (p = 0.05) was also observed.

CONCLUSION:

Consumption of garlic for 9 weeks among pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia led to decreased hs-CRP and increased GSH, but did not affect lipid profiles, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and pregnancy outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Garlic; hs-CRP; metabolic profiles; oxidative stress; pregnancy outcomes

PMID:
25316559
DOI:
10.3109/14767058.2014.977248
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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