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Mucosal Immunol. 2015 May;8(3):618-26. doi: 10.1038/mi.2014.94. Epub 2014 Oct 15.

Dysbiosis caused by vitamin D receptor deficiency confers colonization resistance to Citrobacter rodentium through modulation of innate lymphoid cells.

Author information

1
1] Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA [2] Pathobiology Graduate Program, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.
2
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.
3
1] Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA [2] Center for Molecular Immunology and Infectious Disease, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout (KO) mice had fewer Citrobacter rodentium in the feces than wild-type (WT) mice and the kinetics of clearance was faster in VDR KO than WT mice. VDR KO mice had more interleukin-22 (IL-22)-producing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and more antibacterial peptides than WT mice. The increased ILCs in the VDR KO mice was a cell-autonomous effect of VDR deficiency on ILC frequencies. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation from VDR KO mice into WT resulted in higher ILCs and colonization resistance of the WT mice. Disruption of the gut microbiota using antibiotics in VDR KO mice reversed colonization resistance to C. rodentium infection. Confirming the role of the microbiota in the colonization resistance of VDR KO mice, transfer of the VDR KO microbiota to WT germ-free mice resulted in colonization resistance. Once colonization resistance was overcome, VDR KO mice had increased susceptibility to C. rodentium. VDR expression is a regulator of ILC frequencies, IL-22, dysbiosis, and C. rodentium susceptibility.

PMID:
25315967
PMCID:
PMC4398576
DOI:
10.1038/mi.2014.94
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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