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Environ Int. 2015 Jan;74:23-31. doi: 10.1016/j.envint.2014.09.013. Epub 2014 Oct 11.

Prenatal exposure to PCB-153, p,p'-DDE and birth outcomes in 9000 mother-child pairs: exposure-response relationship and effect modifiers.

Author information

1
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: mcasas@creal.cat.
2
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain.
3
CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; Centre for Public Health Research (CSISP)-FISABIO, Valencia, Spain.
4
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Basque Government, Spain; Health Research Institute, Biodonostia, San Sebastián, Spain.
5
Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, Greece.
6
Inserm, Rennes, France; University of Rennes I, Rennes, France.
7
Department of Genes and Environment, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
8
CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; Centro de Investigación BioMédica, University of Granada, San Cecilio University Hospital, Granada, Spain.
9
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Mol, Belgium.
10
Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDÆA-CSIC), Barcelona, Spain.
11
Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of CA, Davis, USA.
12
Department of Hygiene, Social and Environmental Medicine, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum, Germany.
13
Department of Environmental Health, National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Kuopio, Finland.
14
Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), Barcelona, Spain; National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece.
15
Slovak Medical University, Bratislava, Slovakia.
16
IUF - Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Duesseldorf, Germany.
17
Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO), Mol, Belgium; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Antwerp (UA), Antwerp, Belgium.
18
Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, Faroese Hospital System, Faroe Islands.
19
Ib-salut, Area de Salut de Menorca, Menorca, Spain.
20
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.
21
Erasmus MC Sophia Children's Hospital, University Medical Centre, Department of Pediatrics, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
22
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

Low-level exposure to polychlorinated biphenyl-153 (PCB-153) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p-p'-DDE) can impair fetal growth; however, the exposure-response relationship and effect modifiers of such association are not well established. This study is an extension of an earlier European meta-analysis. Our aim was to explore exposure-response relationship between PCB-153 and p-p'-DDE and birth outcomes; to evaluate whether any no exposure-effect level and susceptible subgroups exist; and to assess the role of maternal gestational weight gain (GWG). We used a pooled dataset of 9377 mother-child pairs enrolled in 14 study populations from 11 European birth cohorts. General additive models were used to evaluate the shape of the relationships between organochlorine compounds and birth outcomes. We observed an inverse linear exposure-response relationship between prenatal exposure to PCB-153 and birth weight [decline of 194g (95% CI -314, -74) per 1μg/L increase in PCB-153]. We showed effects on birth weight over the entire exposure range, including at low levels. This reduction seems to be stronger among children of mothers who were non-Caucasian or had smoked during pregnancy. The most susceptible subgroup was girls whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. After adjusting for absolute GWG or estimated fat mass, a reduction in birth weight was still observed. This study suggests that the association between low-level exposure to PCB-153 and birth weight exists and follows an inverse linear exposure-response relationship with effects even at low levels, and that maternal smoking and ethnicity modify this association.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarkers of exposure; Birth weight; Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE); Persistent organic pollutants; Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

PMID:
25314142
DOI:
10.1016/j.envint.2014.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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