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Neuromodulation. 2015 Jun;18(4):305-12; discussion 312. doi: 10.1111/ner.12243. Epub 2014 Oct 14.

Analysis of adverse events in the management of chronic migraine by peripheral nerve stimulation.

Author information

1
Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
2
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA.
3
Summa Western Reserve Hospital, Cuyahoga Falls, OH, USA.
4
Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA.
5
NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
6
Pain and Wellness Center, Peabody, MA, USA.
7
The Center for Pain Relief, Charleston, WV, USA.
8
St. Jude Medical, Plano, TX, USA.
9
University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

In this study, we analyze device- and procedure-related adverse events (AEs) from a recent prospective, multicenter, double-blinded controlled study that utilized peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) of occipital nerves for management of chronic migraine.

METHODS:

PNS device characteristics (lead length and spacing), surgical techniques including lead orientation (parallel or perpendicular to the nerve), and implantable pulse generator (IPG) placement (upper buttock, abdomen, infraclavicular, or lower axilla) in 157 patients were analyzed to identify any relationship with the AE incidence rate. Number of prior PNS implants performed (NPPIP) by the implanter and its relationship with different AE categories (hardware-related, biological, and stimulation-related events) and frequently observed device/procedure-related AEs (lead migration/fracture/breakage, persistent pain at the lead/IPG location, unintended/undesirable changes in stimulation, infection) were also evaluated. Three-way ANOVA tests were utilized to evaluate the dependence of AE occurrence on the variables described above.

RESULTS:

IPG pocket locations closer to the lead (e.g. infraclavicular region) were associated with a lower AE incidence rate (p < 0.05). Higher NPPIP was related to lower stimulation- and hardware-related AEs (p < 0.05), frequently observed AEs like lead migration, pain, and infection (p < 0.05), and procedure-related additional surgeries (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION:

Implantation of the IPG closer to the lead location was associated with reduced AEs. PNS is a relatively new procedure, and the skill and precision in performing these procedures improves with experience. Our results demonstrate that as the implanter gains more experience with these procedures, a significant reduction in device- and procedure-related AEs may be expected.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00267371.

KEYWORDS:

Adverse events; device characteristics; migraine; peripheral nerve stimulation; surgeon experience

PMID:
25313847
DOI:
10.1111/ner.12243
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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