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PLoS One. 2014 Oct 14;9(10):e110368. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0110368. eCollection 2014.

Knowledge, attitudes and practice of diabetes in rural Bangladesh: the Bangladesh Population based Diabetes and Eye Study (BPDES).

Author information

1
Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia; Organisation for Rural Community Development, Dariapur, Narail, Bangladesh.
2
Organisation for Rural Community Development, Dariapur, Narail, Bangladesh; Centre for Eye Research Australia, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Centre for Eye Research Australia, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
4
Organisation for Rural Community Development, Dariapur, Narail, Bangladesh; Department of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
5
Centre for Eye Research Australia, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia; Avondale College of Higher Education, Cooranbong, Sydney, Australia.
6
Organisation for Rural Community Development, Dariapur, Narail, Bangladesh; Narail Diabetes Hospital and Narail Diabetes Shamity, Narail, Bangladesh.
7
Department of Statistics, Data Science and Epidemiology, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To assess the Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice (KAP) amongst the general community regarding type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in rural Bangladesh.

METHODS:

Data was collected using cluster random sampling from 3104 adults residing in a rural district in Bangladesh. Participants underwent a KAP questionnaire survey regarding assessing diabetes, socio-demographic and medical history. Descriptive, Chi-square and regression analyses were performed.

RESULTS:

Participants were aged between 30 and 89 years (M = 51, SD= 11.8) and 65.5% were female. The prevalence of diabetes was found to be 8.3%. The majority (93%) reported to have heard of diabetes, yet only 4% knew what a glucose tolerance test was. Only 50% reported that they knew physical inactivity was a risk factor. Age, gender, level of education and socio-economic status (SES) were significantly associated with KAP. A lower proportion (41%) of older participants (aged ≥65 years) reported that they knew that dietary modifications assist in diabetes control compared to those aged less than 35 years (69%), p<0.001. Males (β = 0.393, 95% CI = 0.142-0.643), and any level of education compared to no schooling (β = 0.726, 95% CI = 0.596, 0.857) reported significantly more knowledge, after multivariate adjustments for covariates. Participants aged under 35 years, (odds ratio (OR)= 1.73, 95% CI = 1.22-2.43) had significantly higher positive attitudes towards treatments of diabetes compared to those aged ≥65 years. Of the 99 people with known diabetes, more than 50% (n = 52) never had their blood sugar levels checked since diagnosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Knowledge of diabetes and its risk factors is very limited in rural Bangladesh, even in persons diagnosed with type 2 DM. The development of public health programmes to increase knowledge of diabetes and its complications is required to assist people living in rural Bangladesh to control and management of diabetes.

PMID:
25313643
PMCID:
PMC4196995
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0110368
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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