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Int J Hyg Environ Health. 2015 Jan;218(1):147-52. doi: 10.1016/j.ijheh.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Oct 2.

Seafood intake and blood cadmium in a cohort of adult avid seafood consumers.

Author information

1
Program in Public Health, Stony Brook University, United States.
2
Program in Public Health, Stony Brook University, United States; Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, United States.
3
Program in Public Health, Stony Brook University, United States; Department of Preventive Medicine, Stony Brook University, United States. Electronic address: Jaymie.meliker@stonybrook.edu.

Abstract

Although the benefits of fish consumption are widely recognized, seafood may also be a source of exposure to heavy metals such as cadmium. Many types of seafood are rich in cadmium, but bioavailability and potential for toxicity after consumption is less clear. This study investigates the relationship between seafood intake and the level of cadmium (Cd) in the blood in a 252 person cohort of avid seafood consumers in the Long Island Study of Seafood Consumption (New York). Blood cadmium is an established biomarker of cadmium exposure, reflecting both recent and decade-long exposure. Data on the amounts and frequency of eating various types of seafood were self-reported by avid seafood consumers recruited in 2011-2012. After adjusting for age, BMI, sex, current smoking status, and income in a linear regression model, we found no association between regular seafood intake (β=-0.01; p=0.11) but did identify an association between salmon intake in cups/week (ln transformed) (β=0.20; p=0.001) and blood cadmium. After accounting for salmon, no other types of seafood were meaningfully associated with blood cadmium. No association was found between rice intake, blood zinc, or dietary iron or calcium and blood cadmium. Results suggest that seafood is not a major source of cadmium exposure, but that salmon intake does marginally increase blood cadmium levels. Given that cadmium levels in salmon are not higher than those in many other seafood species, the association with salmon intake is likely attributed to higher consumption of salmon in this population.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; Cadmium; Consumption; Fish; Intake; Seafood

PMID:
25311854
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijheh.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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