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Schizophr Res. 2014 Nov;159(2-3):539-42. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.09.023. Epub 2014 Oct 11.

Gluten sensitivity and relationship to psychiatric symptoms in people with schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Temple University School of Medicine, 3500 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140, USA.
2
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
3
Neuropsychiatry Program Sheppard Pratt Hospital, 6501 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21285, USA.
4
Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, 175 Cambridge Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Massachusetts General Hospital East, 16th Street, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA.
5
University of Maryland School of Medicine, 660 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.
6
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, 55 Wade Avenue, Catonsville, MD 21228, USA.
7
National Institute on Drug Abuse, 251 Bayview Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21223, USA.
8
University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, 55 Wade Avenue, Catonsville, MD 21228, USA. Electronic address: dkelly@mprc.umaryland.edu.

Abstract

The relationship between gluten sensitivity and schizophrenia has been of increasing interest and novel mechanisms explaining this relationship continue to be described. Our study in 100 people with schizophrenia compared to 100 matched controls replicates a higher prevalence of gluten sensitivity and higher mean antigliadin IgG antibody levels schizophrenia (2.9 ± 7.7 vs. 1.3 ± 1.3, p = 0.046, controlled for age). Additionally, we examined symptoms within the schizophrenia group and found that while positive symptoms are significantly lower in people who have elevated antigliadin antibodies (AGA; 4.11 ± 1.36 vs. 6.39 ± 2.99, p = 0.020), no robust clinical profile differentiates between positive and negative antibody groups. Thus, identifying people in schizophrenia who may benefit from a gluten-free diet remains possible by blood test only.

KEYWORDS:

Celiac disease; Gliadin; Gluten; Gluten sensitivity; Schizophrenia

PMID:
25311778
PMCID:
PMC4476307
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2014.09.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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