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J Sex Med. 2015 Jan;12(1):189-97. doi: 10.1111/jsm.12713. Epub 2014 Oct 14.

Addressing sexual dysfunction after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy: effects of a brief, psychosexual intervention.

Author information

1
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Women at high risk for ovarian cancer due to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation or family history are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) after age 35 or completion of childbearing. This potentially life-saving surgery leads to premature menopause, frequently resulting in distressing and unaddressed sexual dysfunction.

AIM:

To pilot a novel sexual health intervention for women with BRCA1/2 mutations who previously underwent RRSO a using a single-arm trial. Feasibility and primary outcomes including sexual dysfunction and psychological distress were assessed.

METHODS:

This single-arm trial included a one-time, half-day educational session comprised of targeted sexual health education, body awareness and relaxation training, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy strategies, followed by two sessions of tailored telephone counseling. Assessments were completed at baseline and 2 months postintervention.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Study end points include feasibility and effectiveness as reported by the participant.

RESULTS:

Thirty-seven women completed baseline and postintervention assessments. At baseline, participants had a mean age of 44.4 (standard deviation [SD] = 3.9) years and mean duration of 3.8 (SD = 2.7) years since RRSO. Overall sexual functioning (P = 0.018), as well as desire (P = 0.003), arousal (P = 0.003), satisfaction (P = 0.028), and pain (P = 0.018), improved significantly. There were significant reductions in somatization (P = 0.029) and anxiety scores (P < 0.001), and, overall, for the Global Severity Index (P < 0.001) of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Sexual self-efficacy and sexual knowledge also improved significantly from baseline to postintervention (both P < 0.001). Women were highly satisfied with the intervention content and reported utilizing new skills to manage sexual dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS:

This intervention integrates elements of cognitive behavioral therapy with sexual health education to address a much-neglected problem after RRSO. Results from this promising single-arm study provide preliminary data to move toward conducting a randomized, controlled trial.

KEYWORDS:

Quality of Life and Cancer; Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy and Sexual Dysfunction; Sexual Health and Cancer

PMID:
25311333
PMCID:
PMC4304978
DOI:
10.1111/jsm.12713
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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