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J Trop Med. 2014;2014:545160. doi: 10.1155/2014/545160. Epub 2014 Sep 17.

A descriptive study of nosocomial infections in an adult intensive care unit in fiji: 2011-12.

Author information

1
College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Fiji National University, Suva, Fiji.
2
Colonial War Memorial Hospital, Ministry of Health, Suva, Fiji.
3
Public Health Division, Secretariat of the Pacific Community, Noumea, New Caledonia ; National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Research School of Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia.
4
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France ; Centre for International Child Health, Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne and Murdoch Children Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
5
International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, Paris, France ; The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Abstract

Nosocomial infections in an intensive care unit (ICU) are common and associated with a high mortality but there are no published data from the Oceania region. A retrospective study in Fiji's largest ICU (2011-12) reported that 114 of a total 663 adult ICU admissions had bacteriological culture-confirmed nosocomial infection. The commonest sites of infection were respiratory and bloodstream. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest pathogens isolated, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae (extended-spectrum β-Lactamase-producing), Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species. Mortality for those with a known outcome was 33%. Improved surveillance and implementation of effective preventive interventions are needed.

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