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Eur Urol. 2015 Apr;67(4):660-70. doi: 10.1016/j.eururo.2014.09.036. Epub 2014 Oct 11.

Short-term results after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy compared to open radical prostatectomy.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Urology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.wallerstedt@karolinska.se.
2
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Section of Urology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Faculty of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
4
Department of Urology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
5
Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
6
Department of Urology, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
7
Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
8
Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Department of Oncology, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; Department of Oncology and Pathology, Division of Clinical Cancer Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Stockholm, Sweden.
9
Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy has become a widespread technique despite a lack of randomised trials showing its superiority over open radical prostatectomy.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare in-hospital characteristics and patient-reported outcomes at 3 mo between robot-assisted laparoscopic and open retropubic radical prostatectomy.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

A prospective, controlled trial was performed of all men who underwent radical prostatectomy at 14 participating centres. Validated patient questionnaires were collected at baseline and after 3 mo by independent health-care researchers.

OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

The difference in outcome between the two treatment groups were analysed using logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for identified confounders.

RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS:

Questionnaires were received from 2506 (95%) patients. The robot-assisted surgery group had less perioperative bleeding (185 vs 683 ml, p<0.001) and shorter hospital stay (3.3 vs 4.1 d, p<0.001) than the open surgery group. Operating time was shorter with the open technique (103 vs 175 min, p<0.001) compared with the robot-assisted technique. Reoperation during initial hospital stay was more frequent after open surgery after adjusting for tumour characteristics and lymph node dissection (1.6% vs 0.7%, odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI 95%] 0.11-0.90). Men who underwent open surgery were more likely to seek healthcare (for one or more of 22 specified disorders identified prestudy) compared to men in the robot-assisted surgery group (p=0.03). It was more common to seek healthcare for cardiovascular reasons in the open surgery group than in the robot-assisted surgery group, after adjusting for nontumour and tumour-specific confounders, (7.9% vs 5.8%, OR 0.63, CI 95% 0.42-0.94). The readmittance rate was not statistically different between the groups. A limitation of the study is the lack of a standardised tool for the assessment of the adverse events.

CONCLUSIONS:

This large prospective study confirms previous findings that robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy is a safe procedure with some short-term advantages compared to open surgery. Whether these advantages also include long-term morbidity and are related to acceptable costs remain to be studied.

PATIENT SUMMARY:

We compare patient-reported outcomes between two commonly used surgical techniques. Our results show that the choice of surgical technique may influence short-term outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Complications; Open; Radical prostatectomy; Robot-assisted; Short-term results

PMID:
25308968
DOI:
10.1016/j.eururo.2014.09.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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