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Eat Behav. 2014 Dec;15(4):670-2. doi: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Sep 28.

Associations between relationship stability, relationship quality, and weight loss outcomes among bariatric surgery patients.

Author information

1
Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, United States. Electronic address: shannon.clark4@wayne.edu.
2
Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, MI, United States.
3
St. Vincent Carmel Bariatric Center of Excellence, Carmel, IN, United States.

Abstract

After weight loss surgery (WLS), psychosocial functioning, including the quality of social relationships, generally improves, but for a minority, relationships worsen. We examined how changes in relationship stability and quality from pre- to post-WLS relate to long-term weight loss outcomes. Postoperative patients (N=361) completed surveys which queried relationship changes and weight loss. The sample was 95.9% Caucasian, 80.1% female, averaged 7.7years post-WLS, with a mean age at surgery of 47.7years (range 21-72); 87.3% had a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Four relationship status groups were created: Not in a relationship at surgery or follow-up (No-Rel, n=66; 18.2%); Post-WLS relationship only (New-Rel, n=23; 6%); Pre-WLS relationship only (Lost-Rel, n=17; 5%); and Pre-Post Relationship (Maintainer, n=255; 70.6%). Current BMI was 34.5 for No-Rel; 40.5 for New-Rel; 37.4 for Lost-Rel; 33.3 for Maintainers (p<.05 for Maintainers and No-Rel vs. New-Rel). These same group differences were significant for weight loss, which was not associated with gender, time since surgery, or age at time of surgery, but was associated with pre-WLS BMI (lower pre-WLS BMI was associated with greater %EWL). Analyses were repeated with pre-WLS BMI as a covariate; group differences remained significant [F (3, 355)=3.09, p=.03], as did pre-WLS BMI, [F (1, 355)=9.12, p=.003]. Among Maintainers, relationship quality was associated with weight loss outcomes: those with improved relationships post-WLS had significantly greater %EWL [F (2, 234)=15.82, p<0.000; p<.05 for Improved>(Stayed Same=Got Worse)]. Findings support the importance of assessing relationship stability and quality in pre-WLS candidates, as healthy and stable relationships may support improved long-term outcomes. Interventions to improve relationships pre-and post-WLS may increase both quality of life and weight loss outcomes.

KEYWORDS:

Bariatric surgery; Relationship satisfaction; Weight loss outcomes

PMID:
25308799
DOI:
10.1016/j.eatbeh.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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