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Neuron. 2014 Oct 22;84(2):432-41. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.022. Epub 2014 Oct 9.

Direct reactivation of a coherent neocortical memory of context.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, DNC 202, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
2
Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 710 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.
3
Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, DNC 202, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; The Kellogg School of Science and Technology.
4
Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, 710 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA; UCLA Integrative Center for Learning and Memory; West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, 11301 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90073, USA.
5
Department of Molecular and Cellular Neuroscience, Dorris Neuroscience Center, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, DNC 202, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA. Electronic address: mmayford@scripps.edu.

Abstract

Declarative memories are thought to be stored within anatomically distributed neuronal networks requiring the hippocampus; however, it is unclear how neocortical areas participate in memory at the time of encoding. Here, we use a c-fos-based genetic tagging system to selectively express the channelrhodopsin variant, ChEF, and optogenetically reactivate a specific neural ensemble in retrosplenial cortex (RSC) engaged by context fear conditioning. Artificial stimulation of RSC was sufficient to produce both context-specific behavior and downstream cellular activity commensurate with natural experience. Moreover, optogenetically but not contextually elicited responses were insensitive to hippocampal inactivation, suggesting that although the hippocampus is needed to coordinate activation by sensory cues, a higher-order cortical framework can independently subserve learned behavior, even shortly after learning.

PMID:
25308330
PMCID:
PMC4372249
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuron.2014.09.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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