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Pestic Biochem Physiol. 2014 Oct;115:15-22. doi: 10.1016/j.pestbp.2014.08.003. Epub 2014 Aug 20.

Glyphosate spray drift in Coffea arabica - sensitivity of coffee plants and possible use of shikimic acid as a biomarker for glyphosate exposure.

Author information

1
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark. Electronic address: schruebbers@plen.ku.dk.
2
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Investigación y Desarrollo en Agricultura Tropical S.A. (IDEA Tropical), Alajuela, Costa Rica.
3
Department of Food Science, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
4
Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.

Abstract

Glyphosate is widely used in coffee plantations to control weeds. Lacking selectivity, glyphosate spray drift is suspected to cause adverse effects in coffee plants. Symptoms caused by glyphosate can be similar to those produced by other stress factors. However, shikimic acid accumulation should be a useful biomarker for glyphosate exposure as shown for other crops. The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of coffee plants towards glyphosate on different biological response variables and to evaluate the use of shikimic acid as biomarker. Dose-response experiments yielded ED50 values (50% effect dose) in the range of 38-550 ga.e.ha(-1) depending on the quantitative or qualitative variable monitored. The frequency of plants showing symptoms was the most sensitive variable. The best sampling time for shikimic acid accumulation was 1-2 weeks after glyphosate application, depending on experimental conditions. The highest shikimic acid accumulation was observed in young leaves. Shikimic acid is a suitable biomarker for a glyphosate exposure in coffee, using only young leaves for the analysis. Young coffee plants are susceptible to glyphosate damage. If symptoms are absent the risk of severe crop damage or yield loss is low.

KEYWORDS:

Biomarker; Coffea arabica; Dose–response curve; Glyphosate; Shikimic acid accumulation; Spray drift

PMID:
25307461
DOI:
10.1016/j.pestbp.2014.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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