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Curr Opin Biotechnol. 2015 Jun;33:8-14. doi: 10.1016/j.copbio.2014.09.007. Epub 2014 Oct 8.

Engineering cyanobacteria for direct biofuel production from CO2.

Author information

1
Molecular Microbial Physiology Group, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Molecular Microbial Physiology Group, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Photanol BV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: K.J.Hellingwerf@uva.nl.

Abstract

For a sustainable future of our society it is essential to close the global carbon cycle. Oxidised forms of carbon, in particular CO2, can be used to synthesise energy-rich organic molecules. Engineered cyanobacteria have attracted attention as catalysts for the direct conversion of CO2 into reduced fuel compounds. Proof of principle for this approach has been provided for a vast range of commodity chemicals, mostly energy carriers, such as short chain and medium chain alcohols. More recently, research has focused on the photosynthetic production of compounds with higher added value, most notably terpenoids. Below we review the recent developments that have improved the state-of-the-art of this approach and speculate on future developments.

PMID:
25305544
DOI:
10.1016/j.copbio.2014.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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