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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2014 Nov 20;77:40-9. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2014.10.004. Epub 2014 Oct 13.

Using skin for drug delivery and diagnosis in the critically ill.

Author information

1
Therapeutics Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
2
Intensive Care Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia; Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
3
Dermatology Department, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143-0989, USA.
4
Perinatal Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; UQCCR, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
5
Therapeutics Research Centre, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; School of Pharmacy & Medical Science, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia. Electronic address: m.roberts@uq.edu.au.

Abstract

Skin offers easy access, convenience and non-invasiveness for drug delivery and diagnosis. In principle, these advantages of skin appear to be attractive for critically ill patients given potential difficulties that may be associated with oral and parenteral access in these patients. However, the profound changes in skin physiology that can be seen in these patients provide a challenge to reliably deliver drugs or provide diagnostic information. Drug delivery through skin may be used to manage burn injury, wounds, infection, trauma and the multisystem complications that rise from these conditions. Local anaesthetics and analgesics can be delivered through skin and may have wide application in critically ill patients. To ensure accurate information, diagnostic tools require validation in the critically ill patient population as information from other patient populations may not be applicable.

KEYWORDS:

Critically ill; Diagnosis; Drug delivery; Intensive care; Skin

PMID:
25305335
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2014.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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