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Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:749724. doi: 10.1155/2014/749724. Epub 2014 Sep 11.

Genetic networks lead and follow tumor development: microRNA regulation of cell cycle and apoptosis in the p53 pathways.

Author information

1
Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan ; Division of Research and Development, Kewpie Corporation, Sengawa-cho, Chofu-shi, Tokyo 182-0002, Japan.
2
Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan.

Abstract

During the past ten years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been shown to play a more significant role in the formation and progression of cancer diseases than previously thought. With an increase in reports about the dysregulation of miRNAs in diverse tumor types, it becomes more obvious that classic tumor-suppressive molecules enter deep into the world of miRNAs. Recently, it has been demonstrated that a typical tumor suppressor p53, known as the guardian of the genome, regulates some kinds of miRNAs to contribute to tumor suppression by the induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Meanwhile, miRNAs directly/indirectly control the expression level and activity of p53 to fine-tune its functions or to render p53 inactive, indicating that the interplay between p53 and miRNA is overly complicated. The findings, along with current studies, will underline the continuing importance of understanding this interlocking control system for future therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment and prevention.

PMID:
25302307
PMCID:
PMC4180389
DOI:
10.1155/2014/749724
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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