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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2014 Dec 15;117(12):1451-9. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00665.2014. Epub 2014 Oct 9.

Running economy, not aerobic fitness, independently alters thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running.

Author information

1
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and.
2
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory, Exercise and Sports Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
3
School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and Thermal Ergonomics Laboratory, Exercise and Sports Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia ollie.jay@sydney.edu.au.

Abstract

We sought to determine the independent influence of running economy (RE) and aerobic fitness [maximum oxygen consumption (V̇O 2max)] on thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running by conducting two studies. In study 1, seven high (HI-FIT: 61 ± 5 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1)) and seven low (LO-FIT: 45 ± 4 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1)) V̇O 2max males matched for physical characteristics and RE (HI-FIT: 200 ± 21; LO-FIT: 200 ± 18 ml O2 · kg(-1) · km(-1)) ran for 60 min at 1) 60%V̇O 2max and 2) a fixed metabolic heat production (Hprod) of 640 W. In study 2, seven high (HI-ECO: 189 ± 15.3 ml O2 · kg(-1) · km(-1)) and seven low (LO-ECO: 222 ± 10 ml O2 · kg(-1) · km(-1)) RE males matched for physical characteristics and V̇O 2max (HI-ECO: 60 ± 3; LO-ECO: 61 ± 7 ml O2 · kg(-1) · min(-1)) ran for 60 min at a fixed 1) speed of 10.5 km/h and 2) Hprod of 640 W. Environmental conditions were 25.4 ± 0.8°C, 37 ± 12% RH. In study 1, at Hprod of 640 W, similar changes in esophageal temperature (ΔTes; HI-FIT: 0.63 ± 0.20; LO-FIT: 0.63 ± 0.22°C; P = 0.986) and whole body sweat losses (WBSL; HI-FIT: 498 ± 66; LO-FIT: 497 ± 149 g; P = 0.984) occurred despite different relative intensities (HI-FIT: 55 ± 6; LO-FIT: 39 ± 2% V̇O 2max; P < 0.001). At 60% V̇O 2max, ΔTes (P = 0.029) and WBSL (P = 0.003) were greater in HI-FIT (1.14 ± 0.32°C; 858 ± 130 g) compared with LO-FIT (0.73 ± 0.34°C; 609 ± 123 g), as was Hprod (HI-FIT: 12.6 ± 0.9; LO-FIT: 9.4 ± 1.0 W/kg; P < 0.001) and the evaporative heat balance requirement (Ereq; HI-FIT: 691 ± 74; LO-FIT: 523 ± 65 W; P < 0.001). Similar sweating onset ΔTes and thermosensitivities occurred between V̇O 2max groups. In study 2, at 10.5 km/h, ΔTes (1.16 ± 0.31 vs. 0.78 ± 0.28°C; P = 0.017) and WBSL (835 ± 73 vs. 667 ± 139 g; P = 0.015) were greater in LO-ECO, as was Hprod (13.5 ± 0.6 vs. 11.3 ± 0.8 W/kg; P < 0.001) and Ereq (741 ± 89 vs. 532 ± 130 W; P = 0.007). At Hprod of 640 W, ΔTes (P = 0.910) and WBSL (P = 0.710) were similar between HI-ECO (0.55 ± 0.31°C; 501 ± 88 g) and LO-ECO (0.57 ± 0.16°C; 483 ± 88 g), but running speed was different (HI-ECO: 8.2 ± 0.6; LO-ECO: 7.2 ± 0.4 km/h; P = 0.025). In conclusion, thermoregulatory responses during treadmill running are not altered by V̇O 2max, but by RE because of differences in Hprod and Ereq.

KEYWORDS:

V̇o2max; core temperature; experimental design; heat balance; sweating

PMID:
25301893
PMCID:
PMC4269685
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.00665.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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