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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2014 Oct 14;64(15):1554-64. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.05.075.

Baseline bleeding risk and arterial access site practice in relation to procedural outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention.

Author information

1
Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom; Cardiovascular Research Group, Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; Farr Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. Electronic address: mamasmamas1@yahoo.co.uk.
2
Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom; Cardiovascular Research Group, Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
3
Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
4
University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom.
5
Farr Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom; Institute of Population Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
6
The Heart Hospital, University College London Hospitals, London, United Kingdom.
7
Manchester Heart Centre, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, United Kingdom.
8
Sussex Cardiac Centre, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, United Kingdom.
9
The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough, United Kingdom.
10
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Transradial access (TRA) has been associated with reduced access site-related bleeding complications and mortality after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). It is unclear, however, whether these observed benefits are influenced by baseline bleeding risk.

OBJECTIVES:

This study investigated the relationship between baseline bleeding risk, TRA utilization, and procedure-related outcomes in patients undergoing PCI enrolled in the British Cardiovascular Intervention Society database.

METHODS:

Baseline bleeding risk was calculated by using modified Mehran bleeding risk scores in 348,689 PCI procedures performed between 2006 and 2011. Four categories for bleeding risk were defined for the modified Mehran risk score (MMRS): low (<10), moderate (10 to 14), high (15 to 19), and very high (≥20). The impact of baseline bleeding risk on 30-day mortality and its relationship with access site were studied.

RESULTS:

TRA was independently associated with a 35% reduction in 30-day mortality risk (odds ratio [OR]: 0.65 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.59 to 0.72]; p < 0.0001), with the magnitude of mortality reduction related to baseline bleeding risk (MMRS <10, OR: 0.73 [95% CI: 0.62 to 0.86]; MMRS ≥20, OR: 0.53 [95% CI: 0.47 to 0.61]). In patients with an MMRS <10, TRA was used in 71,771 (43.2%) of 166,083 PCI procedures; TRA was used in 8,655 (40.1%) of 21,559 PCI procedures in patients with an MMRS ≥20, illustrating that TRA was used less in those at highest risk from bleeding complications (p < 0.0001).

CONCLUSIONS:

TRA was independently associated with reduced 30-day mortality, and the magnitude of this effect was related to baseline bleeding risk; those at highest risk of bleeding complications gained the greatest benefit from adoption of TRA during PCI.

KEYWORDS:

Mehran risk score; access site; bleeding risk; femoral; outcomes; radial; transfemoral; transradial

PMID:
25301457
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2014.05.075
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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