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Pediatr Neurol. 2015 Jan;52(1):82-7. doi: 10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2014.08.008. Epub 2014 Aug 27.

A bedside measure of body composition in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

Author information

1
Children's Nutrition Research Centre, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Herston, Queensland, Australia.
2
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
3
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: helen.truby@monash.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In clinical practice, monitoring body composition is a critical component of nutritional assessment and weight management in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We aimed to evaluate the accuracy of a simple bedside measurement tool for body composition, namely bioelectrical impedance analysis, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

METHODS:

Measures of fat-free mass were determined using a bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and compared against estimations obtained from a reference body composition model. Additionally, the use of raw impedance values was analyzed using three existing predictive equations for the estimation of fat-free mass. Accuracy of bioelectrical impedance analysis was assessed by comparison against the reference model by calculation of biases and limits of agreement.

RESULTS:

Body composition was measured in 10 boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, mean age 9.01 ± 2.34 years. The bioelectrical impedance analysis machine values of fat-free mass were on average 2.3 ± 14.1 kg higher than reference values. Limits of agreement (based on 95% confidence interval of the mean) were -7.4 to 2.9 kg. There was a significant correlation between the mean fat-free mass and difference in fat-free mass between the bioelectrical impedance analysis machine and the reference model (r = -0.86; P = 0.02) suggesting that the bias was not consistent across the range of measurements. The most accurate predictive equation for the estimation of fat-free mass using raw impedance values was the equation by Pietrobelli et al. (mean difference, -0.7 kg; 95% limits of agreement, -3.5 to 2.0 kg).

CONCLUSIONS:

In a clinical setting, where a rapid assessment of body composition is advantageous, the use of raw impedance values, combined with the equation by Pietrobelli et al., is recommended for the accurate estimation of fat-free mass, in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

KEYWORDS:

bioelectrical impedance; body composition; duchenne muscular dystrophy; fat mass; fat-free mass

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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