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Clin Nutr. 2015 Aug;34(4):586-92. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2014.09.015. Epub 2014 Oct 3.

Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation affects glucose metabolism and lipid concentrations in overweight and obese vitamin D deficient women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Author information

1
Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.
2
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Iran.
3
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, School of Medicine, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran.
4
Food Security Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran; Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address: Esmaillzadeh@hlth.mui.ac.ir.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Few studies have examined the effects of calcium plus vitamin D supplementation on glucose metabolism and lipid concentrations in overweight and obese vitamin D deficient women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study was conducted to determine the effects of calcium plus vitamin D supplementation on glucose metabolism and lipid concentrations among overweight and obese vitamin D deficient women with PCOS.

METHODS:

This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted among 104 overweight and obese vitamin D deficient women diagnosed with PCOS. Participants were randomly assigned into four groups to receive: 1) 1000 mg/d calcium + vitamin D placebo (n = 26); 2) 50,000 IU/wk vitamin D + calcium placebo (n = 26); 3) 1000 mg calcium/d + 50,000 IU/wk vitamin D (n = 26) and 4) calcium placebo + vitamin D placebo (n = 26) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 8 weeks' intervention to measure glucose metabolism and lipid concentrations.

RESULTS:

Calcium-vitamin D co-supplementation resulted in higher levels of serum calcium (P = 0.002) and vitamin D (P < 0.001) compared with other groups. Co-supplementation, compared with other groups, led to decreased serum insulin levels (P = 0.03), homeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) score (P = 0.04) and a significant rise in quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) (P = 0.001). Furthermore, a significant decrease in serum triglycerides (P = 0.02) and VLDL-cholesterol levels (P = 0.02) was seen following the administration of calcium plus vitamin D supplements compared with the other groups. Co-supplementation with calcium and vitamin D had no significant effects on FPG, total-, LDL-, HDL-, and non-HDL-cholesterol levels.

CONCLUSIONS:

In conclusion, calcium plus vitamin D supplementation for eight weeks among vitamin D deficient women with PCOS had beneficial effects on serum insulin levels, HOMA-IR, QUICKI, serum triglycerides and VLDL-cholesterol levels, but it did not affect FPG and other lipid profiles. Clinical registration numberwww.irct.ir: IRCT201309275623N10.

KEYWORDS:

Calcium; Glucose metabolism; Lipid concentrations; Polycystic ovary syndrome; Supplementation; Vitamin D

PMID:
25300649
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2014.09.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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