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Br J Cancer. 2015 Jan 6;112(1):153-6. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.527. Epub 2014 Oct 7.

Statin use and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: a nationwide study in Denmark.

Author information

1
Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J.B. Winsløws Vej 19, 2.sal, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.
2
1] Clinical Pharmacology, Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, J.B. Winsløws Vej 19, 2.sal, 5000 Odense C, Denmark [2] Department of Clinical Chemistry & Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, J.B. Winsløws Vej 19, 2.sal, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.
3
1] Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark [2] Faculty of Health, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark [3] Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
4
Department of Clinical Pathology, Odense University Hospital, J.B. Winsløws Vej 15, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.
5
Department of Dermatology and Allergy Centre, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.
6
Department of Neurology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Sdr. Boulevard 29, 5000 Odense C, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Evidence is conflicting regarding statin use and risk of basal cell (BCC) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCC).

METHODS:

Using Danish nationwide registries, we identified all patients with incident BCC/SCC during 2005-2009 and matched them to population controls. We computed odds ratios (ORs) for BCC and SCC associated with statin use.

RESULTS:

We identified 38,484 cases of BCC and 3724 cases of SCC. Statin ever use was associated with ORs of 1.09 (CI: 1.06-1.13) for BCC and 1.01 (CI: 0.91-1.11) for SCC.

CONCLUSIONS:

Statin use was not associated with risk of SCC. Residual confounding plausibly explains the marginally increased risk of BCC.

PMID:
25290087
PMCID:
PMC4453598
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.527
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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