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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2015 Feb;96(2):260-8. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2014.09.013. Epub 2014 Oct 5.

Exploratory study of physical activity in persons with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Electronic address: elisabeth.anens@neuro.uu.se.
2
Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
3
Department of Neuroscience, Section for Physiotherapy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore and describe the perceived facilitators and barriers to physical activity, and to examine the physical activity correlates in people with Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional survey study.

SETTING:

Community-living subjects.

PARTICIPANTS:

Swedish people with CMT disease (N=44; men, 54.5%; median age, 59.5 y [interquartile range, 45.3-64.8 y]).

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The survey included open-ended questions and standardized self-reported scales measuring physical activity, fatigue, activity limitation, self-efficacy for physical activity, fall-related self-efficacy, social support, and enjoyment of physical activity. Physical activity was measured by the Physical Activity Disability Survey-Revised.

RESULTS:

Qualitative content analysis revealed that personal factors such as fatigue, poor balance, muscle weakness, and pain were important barriers for physical activity behavior. Facilitators of physical activity were self-efficacy for physical activity, activity-related factors, and assistive devices. Multiple regression analysis showed that self-efficacy for physical activity (β=.41) and fatigue (β=-.30) explained 31.8% of the variation in physical activity (F2,40=10.78, P=.000).

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite the well-known benefits of physical activity, physical activity in people with CMT disease is very sparsely studied. These new results contribute to the understanding of factors important for physical activity behavior in people with CMT disease and can guide health professionals to facilitate physical activity behavior in this group of patients.

KEYWORDS:

Exercise; Fatigue; Neuromuscular diseases; Rehabilitation; Self efficacy

PMID:
25286435
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2014.09.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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