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JAMA Pediatr. 2014 Dec;168(12):1131-7. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1397.

Bisphenol a exposure and the development of wheeze and lung function in children through age 5 years.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania2Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania3currently with the Department of Pediatrics, University.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania.
4
Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.
5
Child and Family Research Institute, British Columbia Children's Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Bisphenol A (BPA), a prevalent endocrine-disrupting chemical, has been associated with wheezing in children, but few studies have examined its effect on lung function or wheeze in older children.

OBJECTIVES:

To test whether BPA exposure is associated with lung function, with wheeze, and with pattern of wheeze in children during their first 5 years.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

A birth cohort study, enrolled during early pregnancy in the greater Cincinnati, Ohio, area among 398 mother-infant dyads. We collected maternal urine samples during pregnancy (at 16 and 26 weeks) and child urine samples annually to assess gestational and child BPA exposure.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES:

We assessed parent-reported wheeze every 6 months for 5 years and measured child forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1) at age 4 and 5 years. We evaluated associations of BPA exposure with respiratory outcomes, including FEV1, child wheeze, and wheeze phenotype.

RESULTS:

Urinary BPA concentrations and FEV1 data were available for 208 children and urinary BPA concentrations and parent-reported wheeze data were available for 360 children. The mean maternal urinary BPA concentration ranged from 0.53 to 293.55 µg/g of creatinine. In multivariable analysis, every 10-fold increase in the mean maternal urinary BPA concentration was associated with a 14.2% (95% CI, -24.5% to -3.9%) decrease in the percentage predicted FEV1 at 4 years, but no association was found at 5 years. In multivariable analysis, every 10-fold increase in the mean maternal urinary BPA concentration was marginally associated with a 54.8% increase in the odds of wheezing (adjusted odds ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.91-2.63). While the mean maternal urinary BPA concentration was not associated with wheeze phenotype, a 10-fold increase in the 16-week maternal urinary BPA concentration was associated with a 4.27-fold increase in the odds of persistent wheeze (adjusted odds ratio, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.37-13.30). Child urinary BPA concentrations were not associated with FEV1 or wheeze.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

These results provide evidence suggesting that prenatal but not postnatal exposure to BPA is associated with diminished lung function and the development of persistent wheeze in children.

PMID:
25286153
PMCID:
PMC4535321
DOI:
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1397
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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