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Vaccine. 2014 Dec 12;32(52):7057-64. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.09.052. Epub 2014 Oct 5.

Safety of immunization during pregnancy: a review of the evidence of selected inactivated and live attenuated vaccines.

Author information

1
Paul Ehrlich-Institut, Paul-Ehrlich-Stra├če 51-59, 63225 Langen, Germany. Electronic address: kelbr@pei.de.
2
Seattle Children's Hospital, Division of Infectious Diseases, 4800 Sand Point Way N.E., R5441, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. Electronic address: janet.englund@seattlechildrens.org.
3
Christian Medical College, Vellore 632 004, Tamil Nadu, India. Electronic address: gkang@cmcvellore.ac.in.
4
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK. Electronic address: Punam.Mangtani@lshtm.ac.uk.
5
University of Washington, PATH, Street: 2201 Westlake Avenue, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98121, Seattle, WA 98109, USA; National Institute for Health and Welfare THL, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: kneuzil@path.org.
6
National Institute for Health and Welfare THL, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: Hanna.Nohynek@thl.fi.
7
Public Health Agency of Canada, 130 Colonnade Road, A/L 6502A, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K9, Canada. Electronic address: rpless2@gmail.com.
8
World Health Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: lambachp@who.int.
9
World Health Organisation, Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address: zuberp@who.int.

Abstract

Vaccine-preventable infectious diseases are responsible for significant maternal, neonatal, and young infant morbidity and mortality. While there is emerging scientific evidence, as well as theoretical considerations, indicating that certain vaccines are safe for pregnant women and fetuses, policy formulation is challenging because of perceived potential risks to the fetus. This report presents an overview of available evidence on pregnant women vaccination safety monitoring in pregnant women, from both published literature and ongoing surveillance programs. Safety data were reviewed for vaccines against diseases which increase morbidity in pregnant women, their fetus or infant as well as vaccines which are used in mass vaccination campaigns against diseases. They include inactivated seasonal and pandemic influenza, mono- and combined meningococcal polysaccharide and conjugated vaccines, tetanus toxoid and acellular pertussis combination vaccines, as well as monovalent or combined rubella, oral poliomyelitis virus and yellow fever vaccines. No evidence of adverse pregnancy outcomes has been identified from immunization of pregnant women with these vaccines.

KEYWORDS:

Inactivated vaccine; Live-attenuated vaccine; Maternal vaccination; Vaccine safety

PMID:
25285883
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.09.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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