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PLoS One. 2014 Oct 6;9(10):e107977. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0107977. eCollection 2014.

Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms in the ADD3 gene and susceptibility to biliary atresia.

Author information

1
Zhuhai Campus of Zunyi Medical College, Zhuhai, Guangdong, China; Department of General Surgery, Shenzhen Children's Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
2
Department of General Surgery, Shenzhen Children's Hospital, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Based on the results of previous studies, the ADD3 gene, located in the 10q24.2 region, may be a susceptibility gene of biliary atresia (BA). In this study, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ADD3 gene, rs17095355 C/T and rs10509906 G/C, were selected to investigate whether there is an association between these SNPs and susceptibility to BA in a Chinese population.

METHODS:

A total of 752 Han Chinese (134 BA cases and 618 ethnically matched healthy controls) were included in the present study. The ADD3 gene polymorphisms were genotyped using a TaqMan genotyping assay.

RESULTS:

Positive associations were found for the SNP rs17095355 in the codominant model; specifically, the frequencies of the CT and TT genotypes and the T allele were higher in the cases than the controls, demonstrating a significant risk for BA (odds ratio [OR] = 1.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-2.58; OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.72-4.86; and OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.34-2.29, respectively). Regarding rs10509906, the per-C-allele conferred an OR of 0.70 (95% CI = 0.49-1.00) under the additive model. A greater risk of BA was associated with the T(a)-G(b) (a for rs17095355 and b for rs10509906) haplotype (OR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.27-2.61) compared with the C(a)-C(b) haplotype.

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests that the ADD3 gene plays an important role in BA pathogenesis and reveals a significant association between two SNPs, rs17095355 and rs10509906, and BA.

PMID:
25285724
PMCID:
PMC4186752
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0107977
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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