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Curr Opin Virol. 2014 Dec;9:53-60. doi: 10.1016/j.coviro.2014.09.006. Epub 2014 Oct 4.

Roseoloviruses in transplant recipients: clinical consequences and prospects for treatment and prevention trials.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States; Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: joshuaah@uw.edu.
2
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States; Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: danielle.zerr@seattlechildrens.org.

Abstract

Roseoloviruses frequently reactivate in transplant recipients. We review the impact of Roseoloviruses in transplant recipients and highlight research priorities. Human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A) and HHV-6B were recently classified as distinct species with important differences. Both viruses can result in inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6, which may cause complications after transplant. HHV-6B is the primary species associated with disease and appears to have pleiotropic effects on the central nervous system. Small preemptive and prophylactic studies have not shown a statistically significant impact on HHV-6 disease. Although Roseoloviruses are associated with diverse complications in transplant patients, studies providing strong evidence for a causal role are lacking. Trials focusing on prevention and treatment will be important to inform the significance of Roseolovirus reactivation.

PMID:
25285614
PMCID:
PMC4570620
DOI:
10.1016/j.coviro.2014.09.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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