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J Exp Psychol Gen. 2014 Dec;143(6):2057-66. doi: 10.1037/a0038025. Epub 2014 Oct 6.

Emodiversity and the emotional ecosystem.

Author information

1
Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
2
Department of Psychology, Yale University.
3
Department of Psychology, Université Catholique de Louvain.
4
Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge.
5
Department of Psychology, Université Libre de Bruxelles.
6
Marketing Unit, Harvard Business School.

Erratum in

  • J Exp Psychol Gen. 2014 Dec;143(6):2066.

Abstract

[Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 143(6) of Journal of Experimental Psychology: General (see record 2014-49316-001). There is a color coding error in Figure 2. The correct color coding is explained in the erratum.] Bridging psychological research exploring emotional complexity and research in the natural sciences on the measurement of biodiversity, we introduce--and demonstrate the benefits of--emodiversity: the variety and relative abundance of the emotions that humans experience. Two cross-sectional studies across more than 37,000 respondents demonstrate that emodiversity is an independent predictor of mental and physical health--such as decreased depression and doctor's visits--over and above mean levels of positive and negative emotion. These results remained robust after controlling for gender, age, and the 5 main dimensions of personality. Emodiversity is a practically important and previously unidentified metric for assessing the health of the human emotional ecosystem.

PMID:
25285428
DOI:
10.1037/a0038025
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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