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Ageing Res Rev. 2014 Nov;18:106-11. doi: 10.1016/j.arr.2014.09.005. Epub 2014 Oct 2.

The measurement of protein synthesis for assessing proteostasis in studies of slowed aging.

Author information

1
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA. Electronic address: Benjamin.f.miller@colostate.edu.
2
Department of Health and Exercise Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.
3
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA.
4
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, USA. Electronic address: jcprice@chem.byu.edu.

Abstract

Slowing the aging process can reduce the risk for multiple chronic diseases simultaneously. It is increasingly recognized that maintaining protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) is important for slowing the aging process. Since proteostasis is a dynamic process, monitoring it is not a simple task and requires use of appropriate methods. This review will introduce methods to assess protein and DNA synthesis using deuterium oxide (D2O), and how protein and DNA synthesis outcomes provide insight into proteostatic mechanisms. Finally, we provide a discussion on how these assessments of protein and DNA synthesis are "mechanistic" investigations and provide an appropriate framework for the further development of slowed aging treatments.

KEYWORDS:

Deuterium oxide; Long-lived model; Mitochondria; Proliferation; Stable isotope

PMID:
25283966
PMCID:
PMC4258117
DOI:
10.1016/j.arr.2014.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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