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Clin Sports Med. 2014 Oct;33(4):707-20. doi: 10.1016/j.csm.2014.06.006. Epub 2014 Sep 22.

Shoulder instability in the military.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, University of South Carolina School of Medicine, 2 Medical Park, Suite 404, Columbia, SC 29203, USA. Electronic address: gddumont@gmail.com.
2
Sports Medicine Service, Massachusetts General Hospital, 175 Cambridge Street, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02114, USA.
3
Sports Medicine Service, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, 175 Cambridge Street, Suite 400, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Abstract

Shoulder instability is common in military populations, and this demographic represents individuals at high risk for recurrence. Surgical management is often indicated, especially in high-demand young individuals, and provides a predictable return to military duties. Accurate recognition of glenoid bone loss and other associated anatomic lesions is of importance for appropriate selection between arthroscopic capsulolabral repair and bony reconstruction procedures. A thorough understanding of underlying pathology, diagnostic testing, and available treatment options provides for optimal care of the unstable shoulder.

KEYWORDS:

ALPSA; Bankart lesion; Glenohumeral instability; Glenoid bone loss; HAGL; Labrum; Military; Shoulder dislocation

PMID:
25280618
DOI:
10.1016/j.csm.2014.06.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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