Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Psychiatry. 2015 Jan;30(1):106-13. doi: 10.1016/j.eurpsy.2014.06.005. Epub 2014 Oct 1.

Bipolar I and II versus unipolar depression: clinical differences and impulsivity/aggression traits.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University, 1051, Riverside Drive, NY 10032, New York, USA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, College of Medicine, United Arab Emirates University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates.
2
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Department, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental, CIBERSAM, Madrid, Spain.
3
Department of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University, 1051, Riverside Drive, NY 10032, New York, USA.
4
286, Madison Ave, New York, NY 10016, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
6
American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, USA.
7
Department of Molecular Imaging and Neuropathology, New York State Psychiatric Institute and Columbia University, 1051, Riverside Drive, NY 10032, New York, USA. Electronic address: mao4@columbia.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate distinguishing features between bipolar I, II and unipolar depression, and impulsivity/aggression traits in particular.

METHODS:

Six hundred and eighty-five (n=685) patients in a major depressive episode with lifetime Unipolar (UP) depression (n=455), Bipolar I (BP-I) disorder (n=151), and Bipolar II (BP-II) (n=79) disorder were compared in terms of their socio-demographic and clinical characteristics.

RESULTS:

Compared to unipolar patients, BP-I and BP-II depressed patients were significantly younger at onset of their first depressive episode, and were more likely to experience their first depressive episode before/at age of 15. They also had more previous affective episodes, more first- and second-degree relatives with history of mania, more current psychotic and subsyndromal manic symptoms, and received psychopharmacological and psychotherapy treatment at an earlier age. Furthermore, BP-I and BP-II depressed patients had higher lifetime impulsivity, aggression, and hostility scores. With regard to bipolar subtypes, BP-I patients had more trait-impulsivity and lifetime aggression than BP-II patients whereas the latter had more hostility than BP-I patients. As for co-morbid disorders, Cluster A and B Personality Disorders, alcohol and substance abuse/dependence and anxiety disorders were more prevalent in BP-I and BP-II than in unipolar patients. Whereas the three groups did not differ on other socio-demographic variables, BP-I patients were significantly more often unemployed that UP patients.

CONCLUSION:

Our findings comport with major previous findings on differences between bipolar and unipolar depression. As for trait characteristics, bipolar I and II depressed patients had more life-time impulsivity and aggression/hostility than unipolar patients. In addition, bipolar I and II patients also differed on these trait characteristics.

KEYWORDS:

Aggression; Impulsivity; Mood; Personality disorder; Substance abuse

PMID:
25280430
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2014.06.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center