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Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2015 Apr;31:104-10. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.09.003. Epub 2014 Sep 30.

Human intracranial high-frequency activity during memory processing: neural oscillations or stochastic volatility?

Author information

1
University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States.
2
University of Pennsylvania, Department of Psychology, Philadelphia, PA 19104, United States. Electronic address: kahana@psych.upenn.edu.

Abstract

Intracranial high-frequency activity (HFA), which refers to fast fluctuations in electrophysiological recordings, increases during memory processing. Two views have emerged to explain this effect: (1) HFA reflects a synchronous signal, related to underlying gamma oscillations, that plays a mechanistic role in human memory and (2) HFA reflects an asynchronous signal that is a non-specific marker of brain activation. We review recent data supporting each of these views and conclude that HFA during memory processing is more consistent with an asynchronous signal. Memory-related HFA is therefore best conceptualized as a biomarker of neural activation that can functionally map memory with high spatial and temporal precision.

PMID:
25279772
PMCID:
PMC4675136
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2014.09.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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