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Nature. 2014 Oct 23;514(7523):450-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13807. Epub 2014 Oct 1.

Pulmonary macrophage transplantation therapy.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary Biology, Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA.
2
Division of Experimental Hematology, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA.
3
RG Reprograming and Gene Therapy, Institute of Experimental Hematology, Hannover Medical School, Carl Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany.
4
1] Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA [2] Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA.
5
Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA.
6
1] Division of Pulmonary Biology, Perinatal Institute, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA [2] Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA [3] Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45229, USA.

Abstract

Bone-marrow transplantation is an effective cell therapy but requires myeloablation, which increases infection risk and mortality. Recent lineage-tracing studies documenting that resident macrophage populations self-maintain independently of haematological progenitors prompted us to consider organ-targeted, cell-specific therapy. Here, using granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor-β-deficient (Csf2rb(-/-)) mice that develop a myeloid cell disorder identical to hereditary pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (hPAP) in children with CSF2RA or CSF2RB mutations, we show that pulmonary macrophage transplantation (PMT) of either wild-type or Csf2rb-gene-corrected macrophages without myeloablation was safe and well-tolerated and that one administration corrected the lung disease, secondary systemic manifestations and normalized disease-related biomarkers, and prevented disease-specific mortality. PMT-derived alveolar macrophages persisted for at least one year as did therapeutic effects. Our findings identify mechanisms regulating alveolar macrophage population size in health and disease, indicate that GM-CSF is required for phenotypic determination of alveolar macrophages, and support translation of PMT as the first specific therapy for children with hPAP.

PMID:
25274301
PMCID:
PMC4236859
DOI:
10.1038/nature13807
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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