Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vet Intern Med. 2014 Nov-Dec;28(6):1770-4. doi: 10.1111/jvim.12448. Epub 2014 Oct 1.

Pituitary dwarfism in Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs is associated with a mutation in LHX3.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Pituitary dwarfism in German Shepherd Dogs is associated with autosomal recessive inheritance and a mutation in LHX3, resulting in combined pituitary hormone deficiency. Congenital dwarfism also is encountered in breeds related to German Shepherd Dogs, such as Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdog dwarfs have the same LHX3 mutation as do Germans Shepherd Dog dwarfs. A specific aim was to determine the carrier frequency among Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs used for breeding.

ANIMALS:

Two client-owned Saarloos wolfdogs and 4 client-owned Czechoslovakian wolfdogs with pituitary dwarfism, 239 clinically healthy client-owned Saarloos wolfdogs, and 200 client-owned clinically healthy Czechoslovakian wolfdogs.

METHODS:

Genomic DNA was amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdog dwarfs, PCR products were analyzed by sequencing. DNA fragment length analysis was performed on the samples from the clinically healthy dogs.

RESULTS:

Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdog dwarfs have the same 7 bp deletion in intron 5 of LHX3 as do German Shepherd Dog dwarfs. The frequency of carriers of this mutation among clinically healthy Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs used for breeding was 31% and 21%, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

An LHX3 mutation is associated with pituitary dwarfism in Saarloos and Czechoslovakian wolfdogs. The rather high frequency of carriers of the mutated gene in the 2 breeds emphasizes the need for screening before breeding. If all breeding animals were genetically tested for the presence of the LHX3 mutation and a correct breeding policy would be implemented, this disease could be eradicated completely.

KEYWORDS:

Canine; Genetic testing; Growth hormone; Mutation

PMID:
25273400
PMCID:
PMC4895634
DOI:
10.1111/jvim.12448
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center